Decorative Ironwork at Retrouvius

Retrouvius have acquired some interesting salvaged metal structures. This decorative ironwork serves almost as a sculpture in itself. Against a wall the intricate details become more and more evident.

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The complex handcrafted piece almost looks like an abstract drawing. The squiggles gradually turn into carefully crafted leaves, moving away from their abstract beginnings.5787_4_of_7

The straight metal lines incorporated into the centre of the structure resemble skyscrapers of an inner city.

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The swirling lines and round shapes then begin to make a little more sense the longer you look at the construction as a whole.
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The curling lines make up the clouds of smoke and fumes surrounding the skyline and elegantly turn into leaves and shapes consistent with the wider picture.

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The ironwork is quite magnificent in its detail and craftsmanship, standing as a piece of art alone.

A Microcosm for Architecture: From Factory to Home

This is an incredible story of a magnificent home that lies north west of Barcelona, Spain’s cultural and artistic capital.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Draped in lush vegetation and offering an abundance of open spaces, this building is impressive not only in size but also in style. It’s features are so unusual for a family home and it is almost unthinkable how such a grand project came about.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

However this was not always a scene of domestic bliss and creative outlet. This towering building once housed the industry that produces the material we use to create most modern structures – cement.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

This is a story of a visionary architect, Ricardo Bofill, who saw the potential for something beautiful to be created from an old dilapidated factory. The result shows the success of his hard work and the realisation of his dream, to create his dream home from an edifice long forgotten and diregarded.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Here is a video about the former cement factory that has become an incredible living space. Expansive ceilings and crawling green plants, make this restored factory building an architectural masterpiece with a great deal of charm.


 
More information and photos found here on yatzer.com.

Retrouvius Take On Alpine Interiors

It’s not really the season for snow but here are some pictures of the Retrouvius design team’s transformation of a cosy chalet tucked away in the Swiss alps. They wanted to achieve a stylish and modern look while retaining some of the original rustic charm of traditional alpine architecture.

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The combination of old wooden planks and familiar soft fabrics work perfectly to create a warm colourful interior.

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The contrast of tweeds and wools used alongside a range of elegant and unsuspecting zesty greens, needlepoint tapestries and silks, add a subtle vibrancy to the home. The use of wood works to ease the impact of differing styles and textures, bringing them together through its natural tones.

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The planks also varied the panelling being highly wire brushed, while the parquet had undergone a slightly more controlled and chic treatment. Nevertheless the neutral colouring of the wood served to unify the range of styles present in the chalet, allowing a mix of modern and bright styles to exist alongside more traditional colours and patterns.

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Sleeping in a Sea of Dreams

If only you could drift to sleep to the gentle rocking of the waves, listening to the rhythm of the the ocean while you are sent into a deep slumber. Well you can do just that – almost. This bed is made from an old salvaged boat suspended from the ceiling. It’s almost like a steady hardwood hammock or a huge crib. And it even doubles up as a sofa and a rocking chair. Imagine sleeping in a boat suspended several inches from the ground like a floating cocoon. Sounds like bliss…the only issue is attaching it to the ceiling.

Boat bed

Boat bed/sofa

 

Around the World in 80 Chairs: Black & White Chair, Israel

Black and white chair with painted details on the upholstery both on the seat and on both sides of the back rest, by Studio Sfog, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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Around the World in 80 Chairs: Salvaged Industrial Chair, Blue Mountains

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Industrial Chair made from found objects by Ian Swift at the Lost Bear Gallery in Leura in the Blue Mountains, Australia.

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The Lost Gypsy Gallery: Shells, Sculptures and Salvage

Driving along in the tumbling hills of the Catlins on New Zealand’s South Island you can stumble across some ‘curios’ places (sorry for the cheesy wordplay – the bay close by is called Curio Bay). The Lost Gypsy Gallery in Papatowai is an incredible little place.

The Lost Gypsy Gallery

Pretty much stuck in the middle of nowhere on one of the most Southern tips of the world, surrounded by astonishing landscapes and secluded beaches is a little caravan with mechanical sculptures and handmade fountains. Coming closer you realise that most of these objects are made of recycled materials, such as scrap metal, old bottles and Paua shells.

Metal mechanical whale. When you turn the handle the whale moves gracefully as if it's swimming in water.

Metal mechanical whale. When you turn the handle the whale moves gracefully as if it’s swimming in water.

When you step into the small bus housing the Lost Gypsy Gallery, cluttered with fantastic tiny little machines or mechanical toys, it is like entering the world of an eccentric genius which is exactly what it is. The walls are covered in small circuits and retro posters of old cartoons and advertisements.

Photo courtesy of Judie Wells (her blog is available here)

Large rounded pearly shells are connected to one another with wires and suspended over a small dish of water, as you turn them they scoop up the water making trickling sounds as the water splashes out again. There are small machines operated by tiny motors or complex mechanical functions everywhere and a little train track reaches all around the little bus on which you can watch a tiny train whizzing past you.

Steps to the Lost Gypsy Gallery

Steps to the Lost Gypsy Gallery

Outside there is a small aluminium caravan which sells delicious coffee, next to it are seats and benches made of reclaimed wood and decorated with glass bottle parts, shells and other discarded materials.

Small bench made from recycled materials

Small bench made from recycled materials

Next to the old gypsy bus is the entrance to the Winding Thoughts Theatre which is full of fun ‘toys’ for grown ups. The star attraction being the piano – each key is connected to an object that makes a sound.

One is connected to a mannequin head covered in dreadlocks fastened with bells, another to a drum while one is connected to a tape recorder running on a circuit.

The Piano Shooting Gallery. Photo courtesy of My Year On A Whim (blog available here)

The complex structure allows you to create a one man band which screeches along and often triggers moving objects. The whole experience is a lot of fun mainly because of the creative energy the place exerts and all the eccentric and brilliant inventions surrounding you.

You can find the creator Blair Somerville working away in his workshop attached to The Lost Gypsy Gallery surrounded by circuits and small tools building numerous mechanical objects. He has been working on this project for the last 15 years adding more and more ambitious pieces to it as he goes along. Each piece is like a work of art, created from discarded or found materials and brought back to life with Blair’s impressive skill and vivid imagination.