A Microcosm for Architecture: From Factory to Home

This is an incredible story of a magnificent home that lies north west of Barcelona, Spain’s cultural and artistic capital.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Draped in lush vegetation and offering an abundance of open spaces, this building is impressive not only in size but also in style. It’s features are so unusual for a family home and it is almost unthinkable how such a grand project came about.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

However this was not always a scene of domestic bliss and creative outlet. This towering building once housed the industry that produces the material we use to create most modern structures – cement.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

This is a story of a visionary architect, Ricardo Bofill, who saw the potential for something beautiful to be created from an old dilapidated factory. The result shows the success of his hard work and the realisation of his dream, to create his dream home from an edifice long forgotten and diregarded.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Here is a video about the former cement factory that has become an incredible living space. Expansive ceilings and crawling green plants, make this restored factory building an architectural masterpiece with a great deal of charm.


 
More information and photos found here on yatzer.com.

Around the World in 80 Chairs: Sabre Chair by Carlos Motta at 19 Greek Street, London

Sabre Carlos Motta for © Espasso courtesy of 19 Greek Street. 19 Greek Street is taking part in the London Design Festival from 14 September – 23 September and will be open Mon – Sat 10am – 6pm Sun – 12pm – 6pm.

London Design Festival 2012 Best Picks

Since the London Design Festival started last Friday exhibitions are popping up all over the capitol. From over 300 hundred different events to choose from it can be difficult to know where to start. Here are the best picks for recycled related design events and exhibitions.

The V&A, the hub of the LDF has several sustainable design exhibitions, including E-side and the Evolutionary Wall. From 14-23 September at the V&A.

Tent London is regarded as the most cutting-edge and progressive trade exhibition during the London Design Festival. Housed in the Old Truman Brewery in Brick Lane, it has a huge range of independent and fascinating designers exhibiting their work. Tent runs from 20-23 September.

100% Design is the largest and most prestigious single-site design event in the UK, it hosts a huge range of brilliant design talent from all around the world. From the 19-22 September at Earls Court Exhibition Centre 2, Warwick Road, London, SW5 9TA.

Decorex is a huge design show held at the Royal Hospital in Chelsea, this is for those with expensive taste, showing high end international interior design exhibits. From 23-26 September at Royal Hospital Road, London, Greater London SW3 4SR.

At the DesignJunction the sustainable exhibition 2nd Cycle  will feature Artek, a Finnish furniture company, which seek to highlight the issue of conscious consuming and authentic design through an upcycling project. Their philosophy promotes traditional craftsmanship with modern interventions. “Nothing old is ever reborn but neither does it totally disappear. And that which has once been born, will always reappear in a new form.”Alvar Aalto, one of the founders of Artek. A sale of second-hand vintage furniture run by Fernandez & Wells, will be available to buy at twentytwentyone. From 19 – 23 September at The Old Sorting Office New Oxford Street.

Mirror by Joe Gibbs courtesy of Designers Block

Designersblock at the Southbank Centre has a selection of sustainable furniture and lighting, featuring UTREM LUX, Polliander, Joe Gibbs and numerous other great designers. From the 20-23 September at the Southbank Centre.

Sustainable Furniture from LA: Blake Avenue

Joshua Tree Credenza by Blake Avenue

Blake Avenue in LA has a wide selection of tables, shelves and cabinets made from reclaimed wood. The products are simple, elegant and beautifully crafted.

Shenandoah Desk by Blake Avenue

Most of the materials that go into Blake Avenue furniture is recovered from architecture that dates back 80 to 150 years and are hand picked and reworked to a high standard.

Krisel Dresser by Blake Avenue

Blake Avenue seek to preserve precious materials with design and craftsmanship that will allow their pieces to last another lifetime.

Tall Lake Tahoe 3 Drawer Dresser by Blake Avenue

Every piece has its own unique characteristics carrying their own stories showing the  the complex and lengthy lifecycle these timbers, carrying with them a history of use and production that will never be repeated.

Shenandoah Hybrid Cabinet by Blake Avenue

Blake Avenue gives these old and sturdy materials a new lease of life by incorporating them into contemporary designs and restoring them to a quality that is built to last.

Eckso Bench by Blake Avenue

Around the World in 80 Chairs: Abandoned Armchair, Moscow – Russia

Armchair in abandoned House of NARKOMFIN by M. Ginzburg, photo courtesy of Nikolai Vassiliev.

Reclaimed Furniture from LA: MFEO

MFEO is a love story between its founders, Van and Claribelle, and their shared love for great design, vintage objects and the growing desire to lead more sustainable lifestyles.

Industrial Grater pendant lights

Slatted Cyclone side table

The pair from Los Angeles seek to reduce the environmental impact of production by primarily using repurposed materials for their designs.

Slat & Dowel reclaimed coffee table

Stump & Pins coffee table

They have a great selection of coffee tables and side tales as well as repurposed lamps.

Skate Sconce wall lamp series

Factory Task lamp & sconce

LASSCO: Salvage, Lunch and Other Curiosities

I recently went for lunch at Brunswick House in Vauxhall, not realising this was a hotspot for antiques and salvaged goods.

The Georgian townhouse looks a little out of place surrounded by the overbearing characterless high rise office buildings around it.

Walking into the old building with an endless ceiling and charming decor was like stepping into another world, away from the busy traffic and stressful office life.

There were old mirrors and clocks on the walls and random pieces of furniture were dotted around, such as a garden gate or an old sewing table.

What makes Brunswick House so fun, is that all the furniture is for sale. There are a huge range of different pieces available, from door knobs to large antique baths.

The rooms are used to display the objects but also serve as function rooms. A perfect setting for creative projects and fashion shoots as well as parties. This also serves as an inspiration for designers and decorators showing ways in which the furniture can be used.

The cafe served delicious traditional food from the small daily menu. Before my lunch arrived I had a chance to peer around the magnificent old building.

Had it been smaller it would have looked cluttered, instead the vast expanse of the building made it look like an exhibition space with a cosy cafe tucked into the middle.

Brunswick House is part of LASSCO a company that specialises in restoration and architectural salvage. They rescued the then derelict building from squatters in 2004 and slowly restored the old Georgian mansion to resemble its grand history.

The Parlour in Brunswick House before restoration

Ballroom of Brunswick House in 2004

The former home of the Dukes of Brunswick which was built in 1758, it looks a little different now with busy roads replacing the three acres of parkland once surrounding it. However it is wonderful to see that such beautiful old buildings can still be saved and be restored to a level where they can be used as busy functional spaces that everyone can enjoy.