A Repurposed Australian Tin Shed

While it has become easier to travel in a more authentic and creative way thanks to the internet and sites like Airbnb and couch surfing, this also counts for the buildings that you can stay in. This iconic tin shed in the Sydney suburb of Redfern (which is available to book through Airbnb) was built with repurposed corrugated iron.

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In Australia corrugated iron is perhaps a more common building material than in European countries. This house has combined modern architecture with the rusty metal to depict the industrial past of the Sydney suburb.

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Australian architect Rafaello Rosselini, whose aim was to repurpose an old tin shed at the back of a residential lot, describes the original building and the renovation process:

“The shed in its current state was dilapidated and structurally unsound. The original tin shed was disassembled and set aside while a new timber frame was erected. The layers of corrugated iron accumulated over generations of repair were reassembled on three facades.”

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The grooves in the large metal sheets create an unusual facade at the front of the building, while the varying shades of rust and old paint create a worn out look you would be more likely to find in a scrap yard.

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Inside the spotless white walls and the sleek wooden floors, show that salvage does not need to result in a compromise in style or quality.

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On Rosselini’s website it states that the “project embraces that it will continue to change with time through rust, decay and repair.”

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Photographs: Mark Syke, Richard Carr

A cabin made from salvaged windows

Nick Olson and Lilah Horwitz have repurposed old windows to create a beautiful framed glass wall as part of their house in a remote part of Western Virginia. Nick a photographer and Lilah a designer decided to quit their jobs in 2012 and went to build this idyllic cabin in the woods, overlooking rolling hills. The old window frames add structure and character to the building, allowing for light to be divided into multiple sections which subtly break up the glass.

Hundertwasser’s Public Toilet

New Zealand, land of astonishing natural beauty, landscapes that almost seem false as they are so incredible and unusual. Land of sensitive and unique flora and fauna, tatoos, the haka, sheep and cattle…and err interesting public toilets. You may think it strange that such a facility is to be featured on this blog for it’s design aesthetic, but it is a pretty strange sight.

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Travelling up to the northern tip of the country to a small town called Paihia, I noticed the small vibrant structure immediately. At first it looks more like a small brick a brack shop or a tourist vendor. However as you come closer you will notice the sign written in multicoloured and individually styled letters reading the words “Paihia’s Wee Toilet”.

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The small box like building is decorated with metal toilets that have been converted into plant pots. Long wild grass potrudes from the disused boat that sits on the roof. Wooden benches line the small coves, proving practical for waiting children. The sloping walls at the entrance allow for a degree of privacy while washing your hands while also welcoming in sunlight. At night the public toilets light up in neon pink and green making it look even more inviting but also fooling some tourists into believing it is a silent dance venue.

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And who may be responsible for such an eccentric piece of architecture in the middle of a tiny remote town on the other side of the world – Hundertwasser of course. The eccentric artist and architect spent a considerable amount of time in New Zealand and although his contribution to Paihia’s architectural landscape was small, it is certainly significant. He would have no doubt also been pleased to know that it was certainly the cleanest public toilet I have ever visited.

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A Microcosm for Architecture: From Factory to Home

This is an incredible story of a magnificent home that lies north west of Barcelona, Spain’s cultural and artistic capital.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Draped in lush vegetation and offering an abundance of open spaces, this building is impressive not only in size but also in style. It’s features are so unusual for a family home and it is almost unthinkable how such a grand project came about.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

However this was not always a scene of domestic bliss and creative outlet. This towering building once housed the industry that produces the material we use to create most modern structures – cement.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

This is a story of a visionary architect, Ricardo Bofill, who saw the potential for something beautiful to be created from an old dilapidated factory. The result shows the success of his hard work and the realisation of his dream, to create his dream home from an edifice long forgotten and diregarded.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Here is a video about the former cement factory that has become an incredible living space. Expansive ceilings and crawling green plants, make this restored factory building an architectural masterpiece with a great deal of charm.


 
More information and photos found here on yatzer.com.

Huts for Humanity on Film

A lovely little video of Huts for Humanity created by the London Chapter of Architecture for Humanity for Clerkenwell Design Week that took place earlier this year. This shows how the huts worked in practice and features short explanations for each hut.

Retrouvius Take On Alpine Interiors

It’s not really the season for snow but here are some pictures of the Retrouvius design team’s transformation of a cosy chalet tucked away in the Swiss alps. They wanted to achieve a stylish and modern look while retaining some of the original rustic charm of traditional alpine architecture.

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The combination of old wooden planks and familiar soft fabrics work perfectly to create a warm colourful interior.

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The contrast of tweeds and wools used alongside a range of elegant and unsuspecting zesty greens, needlepoint tapestries and silks, add a subtle vibrancy to the home. The use of wood works to ease the impact of differing styles and textures, bringing them together through its natural tones.

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The planks also varied the panelling being highly wire brushed, while the parquet had undergone a slightly more controlled and chic treatment. Nevertheless the neutral colouring of the wood served to unify the range of styles present in the chalet, allowing a mix of modern and bright styles to exist alongside more traditional colours and patterns.

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Huts for Humanity

Photo of the Green Hut Photo courtesy of Bonnie Alter

Photo of the Green Hut Photo courtesy of Bonnie Alter

Sadly this years Clerkenwell Design Week (CDW) was a little disappointing in terms of showing smaller independent designers, however there was still lots to see and do of course.

The Huts drawn by Cameo Musgrave photo courtesy of AFH

The Huts drawn by Cameo Musgrave photo courtesy of AFH

The fantastic non-profit organisation – Architecture for Humanity – came up with some very innovative design ideas for this years event. They created  a village of huts – each with a different theme reflecting the ethos of the global charity.

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The Water Hut Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

There was a Green Hut clad with edible plants, a Water Hut which featured an arrangement of pipes and bottles, a Textile Hut that explored soft materials and a Remakery Hut showcasing objects from the Brixton Remakery centre.

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The ‘Textile Hut’ Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The ‘Remakery Hut’ Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Last year Architecture for Humanity launched the successful “Love Architecture” campaign, which saw the “Love Hut” presented in St John’s Lane.

The 'Love Hut' Picture by Ashley Bingham. Picture taken at the Clerkenwell Design Week 2012

The ‘Love Hut’ Picture by Ashley Bingham. Picture taken at the Clerkenwell Design Week 2012

Architecture for Humanity was founded in 1999 by British architect Cameron Sinclair, and operates as a global charity promoting a more sustainable future through the power of professional design.