Sleeping in a Sea of Dreams

If only you could drift to sleep to the gentle rocking of the waves, listening to the rhythm of the the ocean while you are sent into a deep slumber. Well you can do just that – almost. This bed is made from an old salvaged boat suspended from the ceiling. It’s almost like a steady hardwood hammock or a huge crib. And it even doubles up as a sofa and a rocking chair. Imagine sleeping in a boat suspended several inches from the ground like a floating cocoon. Sounds like bliss…the only issue is attaching it to the ceiling.

Boat bed

Boat bed/sofa

 

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The Green Chair Project: Recycled, Comfortable and Affordable

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal Sketch

Sketch of Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

Spanish design studio, Estudio Marsical, have designed an affordable, comfortable, sustainable chair with a 100% recycled plastic recyclable seat.

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

The chair is ideal for small budgets, as the material and the manufacturing process are inexpensive.

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

Because the chairs are all made from recycled material, they all have a dark grey colour. However each chair is unique and they vary slightly from one another.

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

 

Despite its coarse appearance, the seat has good ergonomics thanks to its polygonal geometric shape. To soften its texture, there is a high relief engraving that homogenises it and contrasts with the back of the chair. This displays a vein which makes it more robust and steady. The legs are made of wood and painted metal.

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

Chair 114 by Estudio Mariscal

The Green Chair by the Barcelona based design studio is a project that was designed with the commitment to be affordable, pleasant and sustainable.

Recycled Bicycle Sculpture by Jake Beckman

Bicycle Sculpture by Jake Beckman at the entrance to Morgana Run Bike Trail Cleveland, more information at  the American Trails website.

Bike Sculpture Trail head

Photo courtesy of American Trails

Around the World in 80 Chairs: Black & White Chair, Israel

Black and white chair with painted details on the upholstery both on the seat and on both sides of the back rest, by Studio Sfog, Tel Aviv, Israel.

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Studio Sfog: The Spirit of Bricolage

The Israeli design studio Sfog specialise in reusing and recycling of abandoned and forgotten objects found in warehouses, streets and flea markets. Their functionality is altered in the process to create new contexts and uses.

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The studio’s creations range from unique, one of a kind items, series and interior design. Each work is handcrafted and tells its own individual story, thus revealing the fine line between art and design.

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“This approach allows us to address design with an open mind, challenging art with functionality.”

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Studio Sfog enjoy working in the spirit of bricolage, referring to Claude Levi Strauss’ book “The Science of the Concrete” where Strauss describes this as

“the infinite, improvisational recombination of a fixed series of elements by the designer improviser with tools not intended originally for the purpose in front of him”.

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While both Yotam and Gidi hold a degree in design from two of the top schools in Israel, and keep up to date with the latest design styles and strategies, they choose not to solely rely on the standard techniques and tools available to the classic designer.

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They prefer instead to focus on logic and self-study inside and outside of the studio.

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“We let our work process guide the design and set its mark on the final product. This enables us to show the beauty and sophistication of the design solutions and reveal a new narrative from the original objects.”

Huts for Humanity

Photo of the Green Hut Photo courtesy of Bonnie Alter

Photo of the Green Hut Photo courtesy of Bonnie Alter

Sadly this years Clerkenwell Design Week (CDW) was a little disappointing in terms of showing smaller independent designers, however there was still lots to see and do of course.

The Huts drawn by Cameo Musgrave photo courtesy of AFH

The Huts drawn by Cameo Musgrave photo courtesy of AFH

The fantastic non-profit organisation – Architecture for Humanity – came up with some very innovative design ideas for this years event. They created  a village of huts – each with a different theme reflecting the ethos of the global charity.

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The Water Hut Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

There was a Green Hut clad with edible plants, a Water Hut which featured an arrangement of pipes and bottles, a Textile Hut that explored soft materials and a Remakery Hut showcasing objects from the Brixton Remakery centre.

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The ‘Textile Hut’ Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The ‘Remakery Hut’ Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Last year Architecture for Humanity launched the successful “Love Architecture” campaign, which saw the “Love Hut” presented in St John’s Lane.

The 'Love Hut' Picture by Ashley Bingham. Picture taken at the Clerkenwell Design Week 2012

The ‘Love Hut’ Picture by Ashley Bingham. Picture taken at the Clerkenwell Design Week 2012

Architecture for Humanity was founded in 1999 by British architect Cameron Sinclair, and operates as a global charity promoting a more sustainable future through the power of professional design.

Recycled Jewellery Stand

Here is a great idea for a simple bit of DIY design. This is a jewellery stand made from an old piece of wood, salvaged from a barn. It had all these nails lodged into it so my aunt thought it would be perfect to hang her jewellery. It’s simple and in this case only required someone to hang it up.

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