Sustainable Furniture from LA: Blake Avenue

Joshua Tree Credenza by Blake Avenue

Blake Avenue in LA has a wide selection of tables, shelves and cabinets made from reclaimed wood. The products are simple, elegant and beautifully crafted.

Shenandoah Desk by Blake Avenue

Most of the materials that go into Blake Avenue furniture is recovered from architecture that dates back 80 to 150 years and are hand picked and reworked to a high standard.

Krisel Dresser by Blake Avenue

Blake Avenue seek to preserve precious materials with design and craftsmanship that will allow their pieces to last another lifetime.

Tall Lake Tahoe 3 Drawer Dresser by Blake Avenue

Every piece has its own unique characteristics carrying their own stories showing the  the complex and lengthy lifecycle these timbers, carrying with them a history of use and production that will never be repeated.

Shenandoah Hybrid Cabinet by Blake Avenue

Blake Avenue gives these old and sturdy materials a new lease of life by incorporating them into contemporary designs and restoring them to a quality that is built to last.

Eckso Bench by Blake Avenue

LASSCO: Salvage, Lunch and Other Curiosities

I recently went for lunch at Brunswick House in Vauxhall, not realising this was a hotspot for antiques and salvaged goods.

The Georgian townhouse looks a little out of place surrounded by the overbearing characterless high rise office buildings around it.

Walking into the old building with an endless ceiling and charming decor was like stepping into another world, away from the busy traffic and stressful office life.

There were old mirrors and clocks on the walls and random pieces of furniture were dotted around, such as a garden gate or an old sewing table.

What makes Brunswick House so fun, is that all the furniture is for sale. There are a huge range of different pieces available, from door knobs to large antique baths.

The rooms are used to display the objects but also serve as function rooms. A perfect setting for creative projects and fashion shoots as well as parties. This also serves as an inspiration for designers and decorators showing ways in which the furniture can be used.

The cafe served delicious traditional food from the small daily menu. Before my lunch arrived I had a chance to peer around the magnificent old building.

Had it been smaller it would have looked cluttered, instead the vast expanse of the building made it look like an exhibition space with a cosy cafe tucked into the middle.

Brunswick House is part of LASSCO a company that specialises in restoration and architectural salvage. They rescued the then derelict building from squatters in 2004 and slowly restored the old Georgian mansion to resemble its grand history.

The Parlour in Brunswick House before restoration

Ballroom of Brunswick House in 2004

The former home of the Dukes of Brunswick which was built in 1758, it looks a little different now with busy roads replacing the three acres of parkland once surrounding it. However it is wonderful to see that such beautiful old buildings can still be saved and be restored to a level where they can be used as busy functional spaces that everyone can enjoy.

Folklore – Better Living by Design

Folklore is a beautiful new shop right up our street – literally. It may be a little difficult to find at first, wedged in between two Gill Wing stores and boasting an antique sign which reads 193 BERWIC rather than Folklore.

On my second visit I almost got lost, failing to notice it due to its inconspicuous shop front. However, after spotting the paper and crotchet lampshades in the window I was reminded why it had initially caught my eye.

They later explained that they had kept the old sign allowing it to add to the character of the shop while corresponding with their philosophy of sustainability.

The Cabinet – designed and made in collaboration with the Hendzel + Hunt studio in South London. Constructed from reclaimed birch ply. Available exclusively from Folklore.

Danielle Reid and her husband Rob opened the shop on Islington’s trendy Upper Street 1 month ago. The couple started the company, based on the belief that better living is possible through design. They curate a selection of pieces by a mix of designers, makers and craftsmen and try to source locally where possible.

Everything inside Folklore is either handmade, antique or made from recycled or found materials. Others are easily recyclable at the end of their life. All are made in an environmentally mindful way. Danielle strongly believes that ecology and ethics are integral to design and there is a theme throughout the shop which emphasises the importance of being environmentally mindful.

As recycling becomes more mainstream and becomes the norm, recycled goods and furniture are becoming more beautiful in their own right. Folklore paves the way for sustainable living and proves that recycling can be elegant by exploring diverse styles and uses of materials.

You can also like Folklore on Facebook and follow them on Twitter and Pinterest.