Huts for Humanity

Photo of the Green Hut Photo courtesy of Bonnie Alter

Photo of the Green Hut Photo courtesy of Bonnie Alter

Sadly this years Clerkenwell Design Week (CDW) was a little disappointing in terms of showing smaller independent designers, however there was still lots to see and do of course.

The Huts drawn by Cameo Musgrave photo courtesy of AFH

The Huts drawn by Cameo Musgrave photo courtesy of AFH

The fantastic non-profit organisation – Architecture for Humanity – came up with some very innovative design ideas for this years event. They created  a village of huts – each with a different theme reflecting the ethos of the global charity.

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The Water Hut Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

There was a Green Hut clad with edible plants, a Water Hut which featured an arrangement of pipes and bottles, a Textile Hut that explored soft materials and a Remakery Hut showcasing objects from the Brixton Remakery centre.

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The ‘Textile Hut’ Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

The ‘Remakery Hut’ Photo courtesy of Cate St Hill

Last year Architecture for Humanity launched the successful “Love Architecture” campaign, which saw the “Love Hut” presented in St John’s Lane.

The 'Love Hut' Picture by Ashley Bingham. Picture taken at the Clerkenwell Design Week 2012

The ‘Love Hut’ Picture by Ashley Bingham. Picture taken at the Clerkenwell Design Week 2012

Architecture for Humanity was founded in 1999 by British architect Cameron Sinclair, and operates as a global charity promoting a more sustainable future through the power of professional design.

Around the World in 80 Chairs: Natural Grain Kite Stool, London

Natural Grain Kite Stool by Blakebrough + King  © Supercyclers.
Photo Courtesy of 19 Greek Street. The stool was created from natural food by-products such as wheat and rice straw and moulded using resin.

Cardboard Concept

Simple chair in variant finish option

Cardboard Concept uses recyclable cardboard to create stylish modern eco furniture. The highly innovative company focuses on high quality designer pieces suitable for a range of different settings.

Narvik chair in color finish option with froger desk- bespoke design

The sleek design of the Narvik chair does not fit into the stereotypical image of eco furniture. It’s sturdy elegant build is that of a piece usually found in a modern gallery.

Narvik chair in variant finish option

Carboard Concept’s unique designs and advanced use of cardboard allows them to create eccentric and simple shapes built to last.

High stools- bespoke design

All their products are fully handmade allowing every piece to meet their high standards of quality.

Simple chairs as dining chairs , classic finish option

Cardboard Concept focuses on sustainable green living and makes use of  new technologies in handmade furniture making.

Finish

Using 100% recyclable cardboard from local sources, environmentally friendly glues and paints allowing their products to be produced in an environmentally friendly way.

Sumo- wall mounted TV unit-bespoke design

Folklore – Better Living by Design

Folklore is a beautiful new shop right up our street – literally. It may be a little difficult to find at first, wedged in between two Gill Wing stores and boasting an antique sign which reads 193 BERWIC rather than Folklore.

On my second visit I almost got lost, failing to notice it due to its inconspicuous shop front. However, after spotting the paper and crotchet lampshades in the window I was reminded why it had initially caught my eye.

They later explained that they had kept the old sign allowing it to add to the character of the shop while corresponding with their philosophy of sustainability.

The Cabinet – designed and made in collaboration with the Hendzel + Hunt studio in South London. Constructed from reclaimed birch ply. Available exclusively from Folklore.

Danielle Reid and her husband Rob opened the shop on Islington’s trendy Upper Street 1 month ago. The couple started the company, based on the belief that better living is possible through design. They curate a selection of pieces by a mix of designers, makers and craftsmen and try to source locally where possible.

Everything inside Folklore is either handmade, antique or made from recycled or found materials. Others are easily recyclable at the end of their life. All are made in an environmentally mindful way. Danielle strongly believes that ecology and ethics are integral to design and there is a theme throughout the shop which emphasises the importance of being environmentally mindful.

As recycling becomes more mainstream and becomes the norm, recycled goods and furniture are becoming more beautiful in their own right. Folklore paves the way for sustainable living and proves that recycling can be elegant by exploring diverse styles and uses of materials.

You can also like Folklore on Facebook and follow them on Twitter and Pinterest.