A cabin made from salvaged windows

Nick Olson and Lilah Horwitz have repurposed old windows to create a beautiful framed glass wall as part of their house in a remote part of Western Virginia. Nick a photographer and Lilah a designer decided to quit their jobs in 2012 and went to build this idyllic cabin in the woods, overlooking rolling hills. The old window frames add structure and character to the building, allowing for light to be divided into multiple sections which subtly break up the glass.

Hundertwasser’s Public Toilet

New Zealand, land of astonishing natural beauty, landscapes that almost seem false as they are so incredible and unusual. Land of sensitive and unique flora and fauna, tatoos, the haka, sheep and cattle…and err interesting public toilets. You may think it strange that such a facility is to be featured on this blog for it’s design aesthetic, but it is a pretty strange sight.

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Travelling up to the northern tip of the country to a small town called Paihia, I noticed the small vibrant structure immediately. At first it looks more like a small brick a brack shop or a tourist vendor. However as you come closer you will notice the sign written in multicoloured and individually styled letters reading the words “Paihia’s Wee Toilet”.

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The small box like building is decorated with metal toilets that have been converted into plant pots. Long wild grass potrudes from the disused boat that sits on the roof. Wooden benches line the small coves, proving practical for waiting children. The sloping walls at the entrance allow for a degree of privacy while washing your hands while also welcoming in sunlight. At night the public toilets light up in neon pink and green making it look even more inviting but also fooling some tourists into believing it is a silent dance venue.

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And who may be responsible for such an eccentric piece of architecture in the middle of a tiny remote town on the other side of the world – Hundertwasser of course. The eccentric artist and architect spent a considerable amount of time in New Zealand and although his contribution to Paihia’s architectural landscape was small, it is certainly significant. He would have no doubt also been pleased to know that it was certainly the cleanest public toilet I have ever visited.

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A Microcosm for Architecture: From Factory to Home

This is an incredible story of a magnificent home that lies north west of Barcelona, Spain’s cultural and artistic capital.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Draped in lush vegetation and offering an abundance of open spaces, this building is impressive not only in size but also in style. It’s features are so unusual for a family home and it is almost unthinkable how such a grand project came about.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

However this was not always a scene of domestic bliss and creative outlet. This towering building once housed the industry that produces the material we use to create most modern structures – cement.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

This is a story of a visionary architect, Ricardo Bofill, who saw the potential for something beautiful to be created from an old dilapidated factory. The result shows the success of his hard work and the realisation of his dream, to create his dream home from an edifice long forgotten and diregarded.

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Ricardo Bofill cement factory courtesy of Ricardo Bofill and first seen on yatzer

Here is a video about the former cement factory that has become an incredible living space. Expansive ceilings and crawling green plants, make this restored factory building an architectural masterpiece with a great deal of charm.


 
More information and photos found here on yatzer.com.

Huts for Humanity on Film

A lovely little video of Huts for Humanity created by the London Chapter of Architecture for Humanity for Clerkenwell Design Week that took place earlier this year. This shows how the huts worked in practice and features short explanations for each hut.

Merging Traditional and Stucco Designs

Artists Jessica Stockholder and Patrick Chamberlain envisioned a large expansive space to serve as a studio for Jessica which would allow her to work on her sculptures.

The couple worked with architect Joseph Bergin to create a suitable extension. They had a clear idea in mind from the very beginning, telling Bergin “We want stuccoe cubes“.

The existing garage attached to the house was demolished to make space for the studio. The new studio includes a 600-square-foot section for cars.

Stockholder often creates her work in relation to wall surface and space, so she wanted a lot of blank wall space. The walls in her new studio range from 12 to 16 feet high.

Bergin also installed clerestory windows above several walls to let in light without taking up valuable space. A large additional window on the back of the studio overlooks the garden allowing you to look out and enjoy a beautiful view.

The connecting space between the studio and the house was a key part of the addition’s design and acts as a mudroom. It blends the two buildings’ styles, combining traditional architecture with the studio’s stucco exterior.

For the original article see below.

Nina Tolstrup: Re-Imagined, Rescued & Reclaimed

© Jamie McGregor Smith | Courtesy of 19 Greek Street

The Pallet Project exhibited at 19 Greek Street  by Danish London based designer Nina Tolstrup constructs furniture from the reclaimed wood of unused pallets.

Pallet Chair | © Nina Tolstrup | Courtesy of 19 Greek Street

An organisation has now been set-up by Tolstrup in Lugano, Buenos Aires to help people emerge poverty through design training and development.

Pallet Chair ‘Pollocky’ by Gavin Turk ©Gavin Turk

London based Danish designer Nina Tolstrup founded Studiomama in 2000 with husband and design collaborator Jack Mama.

Nina Tolstrup in the studio ©Katherine Fawssett

Before settling in London, she trained as a designer at the prestigious Les Ateliers school of industrial design in Paris and has a BA in Marketing from the Business School in Copenhagen.

Bloomberg Chair | © Nina Tolstrup Courtesy of 19 Greek Street

True to Nina’s Scandinavian roots, simplicity and integrity are the trademarks of her work; a pared-down, contemporary but characterful aesthetic combined with a democratic belief in good design for all. Passionate beliefs in designing for the real world go a long way to explaining the timeless and unpretentious qualities of the studio’s work.

Rescued Chairs | © Nina Tolstrup Courtesy of 19 Greek Street

But whilst Studiomama’s work can be simple, honest and minimal it is always playful, irreverent and humorous. The Re-Imagine Project, also exhibited at 19 Greek Street are a series of brightly coloured re-upholstered (Rescued) chairs that combine the idea of resourcefulness and reinvention with an element of fun and style.

Rescued Chairs | © Nina Tolstrup & David David Courtesy of 19 Greek Street

Both the pallet chairs and the rescued chairs come in a range of different colours and patterns, proving that reclaimed materials can be reworked into new and exciting designs.

Around the World in 80 Chairs: Chairs at the Design Junction, London

Chairs at the Design Junction for the London Design Festival 2012 at The Old Sorting Office in New Oxford Street. Photo courtesy of Design Junction.