Update – Event Cancelled – Design for Good at the Living Furniture Project

Sadly I have just been informed that the event below has been cancelled, however see the links below to find out about Wasteland the inspiring documentary by Vik Muniz and the Living Furniture Project in their new showroom/cafe in 22-26 Farringdon Lane. Please see our feed on the right hand column of the blog for more info on upcoming events. I will also be posting more on the London Design Festival for the next two weeks.

VIK MUNIZ LOOKS DOWN AT MAGNA'S PHOTO AND PORTRAIT  (SCREEN GRAB) Artwork courtesy of Vik Muniz Studio

VIK MUNIZ LOOKS DOWN AT MAGNA’S PHOTO AND PORTRAIT
(SCREEN GRAB) Artwork courtesy of Vik Muniz Studio

Next Monday, 16 September, there will be a screening of the award winning documentary Wasteland, as part of London Design Week. The film surrounds a landfill in Rio, Brazil and the lives of those that live and work on the site, while artist Vik Muniz creates art using discarded objects he finds among the rubbish.

LFP's workshop and showroom in Clerkenwell

LFP’s workshop and showroom in Clerkenwell

The event will be hosted by the Living Furniture Project at their fantastic new space in 22-26 Farringdon Lane in London and will feature talks and discussions as part of the evening. The speakers include representatives from Friends of the Earth, The Living Furniture Project’s very own Donna Walker, the renowned furniture designer Paul Kelley and product designer Erin Deighton. There will also be video art by Tom Sachs, which will be screened throughout.

To register click here.

The Found Series by Michael Aaron: making art from discarded materials

Michael Aaron Williams, a young American artist from Knoxville, Tennessee, has created art from discarded materials.

Found series 1 by Michael Aaron - on old railroad ties.

Found series 1 by Michael Aaron – on old railroad ties.

He uses the materials he has found as a canvas to create intense and almost disturbing portraits. The organic and decomposing state of the pieces adds to the raw visual effect while also showing the beautiful transformation the artist has achieved.

Found series 2 by Michael Aaron - on old rusty sheet metal

Found series 2 by Michael Aaron – on old rusty sheet metal

Michael Aaron seeks to save materials from their fate and repurpose them, making them into something that is valued and appreciated.

 “These pieces are done on things that have been found on the side of the road, railroad tracks and in old barns. Basically it is about using something that would have deteriorated over time if left where it was and taking them into the studio and making something beautiful out of them.”

Found series 3 by Michael Aaron - sheet metal

Found series 3 by Michael Aaron – sheet metal

He does not only experiment with different materials, but also different techniques in composing his work. The piece below has been created using a process of burning the wood rather than painting it.

Found series 4 by Michael Aaron - burnt onto old barn wood

Found series 4 by Michael Aaron – burnt onto old barn wood

Each portrait is simple yet captivating and very real, showing the artists ability to capture human emotion.

Found series 5 by Michael Aaron - this one is on an old wrecked up carhood

Found series 5 by Michael Aaron – this one is on an old wrecked up carhood

Decorative Ironwork at Retrouvius

Retrouvius have acquired some interesting salvaged metal structures. This decorative ironwork serves almost as a sculpture in itself. Against a wall the intricate details become more and more evident.

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The complex handcrafted piece almost looks like an abstract drawing. The squiggles gradually turn into carefully crafted leaves, moving away from their abstract beginnings.5787_4_of_7

The straight metal lines incorporated into the centre of the structure resemble skyscrapers of an inner city.

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The swirling lines and round shapes then begin to make a little more sense the longer you look at the construction as a whole.
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The curling lines make up the clouds of smoke and fumes surrounding the skyline and elegantly turn into leaves and shapes consistent with the wider picture.

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The ironwork is quite magnificent in its detail and craftsmanship, standing as a piece of art alone.

Street Art in Bogota

Street art outside a cafe in La Candelaria, Bogota’s old town, in Colombia. The woman is holding up a sign saying “nadie gana” (- nobody wins) below a game of noughts and crosses.

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Calm: Perception and Disaster

Chinese art collective Made In Company (Xu Zhen)  have produced a rather unsightly yet inconspicuous art installation on display in Vancouver, Canada. Outside the downtown Shangri-La Hotel, lies a large rectangle of rubble. However these are no ordinary remnants from a demolition site.

MadeIn Company, Calm, 2013. Mixed-media installation at Vancouver Art Gallery Offsite. Photo courtesy of Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery.

MadeIn Company, Calm, 2013. Mixed-media installation at Vancouver Art Gallery Offsite. Photo courtesy of Rachel Topham, Vancouver Art Gallery.

When you step on the surface amid all the debris and broken bricks, the ground begins to wobble bouncing up and down like a giant water bed. The installation titled Calm signifies the the inert reaction that follows a violent event while also, rather playfully challenging the onlookers perception of reality.

“Calm alludes to the stillness that follows a disaster, while simultaneously embodying the threat of latent and imminent danger that precedes a proverbial storm. The piece’s ambiguity questions ways of observing, believing and understanding facts, reminding us that truth is not always what it seems.”

Houston’s waterways transformed into a sculpture garden

American artist Jeremy Underwood has transformed Houston’s waterways to showcase his sculptures made from discarded materials.

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The project titled “Human Debris” reflects both the visual and environmental impact of people and urbanisation on the natural world. Underwood describes his work as a reinterpretation of the waste materials left behind “Human Debris is a commentary on what humans leave in the natural landscape.”

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In his hometown of Houston, Underwood focused on reinventing these unwanted materials into something beautiful, while making a statement about the volume of waste channelled into these natural landscapes.

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“The project spotlights the environmental condition of Houston’s waterways through the building of site-specific sculptures assembled out of harvested debris collected from the beach.”

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Through this project he has made a bold statement about recycling and sustainability, he has not only highlighted the amount of waste left by humans, but he has also shown the value and versatility of these objects. “Each found material lends itself to a new creation, encompassing the former life of the debris into each sculpture.”

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“These objects are simply artifacts to support the work, photographed in interaction with the landscape, then left to be discovered.”

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Through his work he seek to challenge viewers to “reflect upon our consumer culture, the relationship we have with our environment, and the pervasion of pollution.”

Street Art Bogota

A man pushes a cart past a building decorated with murals in La Candelaria, Bogota – Colombia.

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